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120 West Jones - City Guide

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120 West Jones - City Guide

Food scene
Family-owned Italian eatery offering house-made pastas and pre-fix dinner menu with a BYOB option. If you are looking for TRUE Italian cuisine, this is the place. All pasta, sauces, soups, bread made in-house daily.
Frali Gourmet
217 W Liberty St
Family-owned Italian eatery offering house-made pastas and pre-fix dinner menu with a BYOB option. If you are looking for TRUE Italian cuisine, this is the place. All pasta, sauces, soups, bread made in-house daily.
Cozy American bistro & bar with extensive food & beer menus in a century-old former grocery store. Ask any local where the locals go and Crystal Beer Parlor will always be mentioned.
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Crystal Beer Parlor
301 West Jones Street
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Cozy American bistro & bar with extensive food & beer menus in a century-old former grocery store. Ask any local where the locals go and Crystal Beer Parlor will always be mentioned.
Family-owned since 1943, this busy Southern diner serves ample lunches to guests at communal tables. A staple in Savannah since 1943. If you see people wrapped around the block, you can be sure they are lining up for Mrs. Wilkes.
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Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room
107 West Jones Street
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Family-owned since 1943, this busy Southern diner serves ample lunches to guests at communal tables. A staple in Savannah since 1943. If you see people wrapped around the block, you can be sure they are lining up for Mrs. Wilkes.
Dual venue French bistro and casual pub in the heart of the historic district. One of our all time favorite restaurants for fine French dining and delicious cocktails.
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Circa 1875
48 Whitaker Street
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Dual venue French bistro and casual pub in the heart of the historic district. One of our all time favorite restaurants for fine French dining and delicious cocktails.
Refined Italian dishes with seafood leanings are showcased in a romantic former firehouse. Garibaldi always impresses with their exquisite menu and gorgeous decor.
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Garibaldi Cafe
315 West Congress Street
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Refined Italian dishes with seafood leanings are showcased in a romantic former firehouse. Garibaldi always impresses with their exquisite menu and gorgeous decor.
"If you have ever visited Clary’s Café, then you know that they’re about far more than the food. It is a place full of nostalgia and intriguing characters. It is a colorful mosaic of times and people and the bonds that have formed throughout the years. The feelings of home and family are evident when you walk through the door. As you look around at all of the knickknacks, paintings, family pictures and memorabilia that form its décor, you may wonder how a drugstore could have evolved into what you see now…..World Famous Clary’s Café. For the answers you need look no further than the people. The customers, employees, and owners all bring their own colors and strokes to the canvas. Visit us today and join the Clary’s Café family."
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Clary's Cafe
404 Abercorn Street
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"If you have ever visited Clary’s Café, then you know that they’re about far more than the food. It is a place full of nostalgia and intriguing characters. It is a colorful mosaic of times and people and the bonds that have formed throughout the years. The feelings of home and family are evident when you walk through the door. As you look around at all of the knickknacks, paintings, family pictures and memorabilia that form its décor, you may wonder how a drugstore could have evolved into what you see now…..World Famous Clary’s Café. For the answers you need look no further than the people. The customers, employees, and owners all bring their own colors and strokes to the canvas. Visit us today and join the Clary’s Café family."
Airy cafe of a century-old roasting company serving its own brews plus breakfast and sandwiches.
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Savannah Coffee Roasters
215 West Liberty Street
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Airy cafe of a century-old roasting company serving its own brews plus breakfast and sandwiches.
Seventeen seventy-one, the opening of the Habersham House –later called “The Olde Pink House” when the soft native brick began to bleed through the plastered walls and mysteriously changed the color of the Habersham house from white to Jamaican pink. A National Landmark, Savannah’s stately Georgian Mansion facing Reynolds Square has an exciting history. Built on land granted by the crown of England, James Habersham Jr. lived in his mansion from 1771 to 1800. This wealthy planter’s home held many secret meetings which helped to secure the independence of the 13 colonies from England. Again the ageless Halls of Habersham echo the pleasure of dining by candlelight as James Habersham, Jr. enjoyed in 1771. The ghosts of the past walk freely with you on your visit through the elegant rooms, vault wine cellars, up the fine staircases, or down for a drink by the massive Planters Tavern Fires.
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The Olde Pink House
23 Abercorn St
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Seventeen seventy-one, the opening of the Habersham House –later called “The Olde Pink House” when the soft native brick began to bleed through the plastered walls and mysteriously changed the color of the Habersham house from white to Jamaican pink. A National Landmark, Savannah’s stately Georgian Mansion facing Reynolds Square has an exciting history. Built on land granted by the crown of England, James Habersham Jr. lived in his mansion from 1771 to 1800. This wealthy planter’s home held many secret meetings which helped to secure the independence of the 13 colonies from England. Again the ageless Halls of Habersham echo the pleasure of dining by candlelight as James Habersham, Jr. enjoyed in 1771. The ghosts of the past walk freely with you on your visit through the elegant rooms, vault wine cellars, up the fine staircases, or down for a drink by the massive Planters Tavern Fires.
Neighborhoods
The Historic District -- The primary reason to visit Savannah, the Historic District encompasses both the Riverfront and the City Market. It’s officially bordered by the Savannah River and Forsyth Park at Gaston Street, and Montgomery and Price streets. Within its borders are more than 2,350 architecturally and historically significant buildings in a 2 1/2-square-mile area.
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Historic District - North
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The Historic District -- The primary reason to visit Savannah, the Historic District encompasses both the Riverfront and the City Market. It’s officially bordered by the Savannah River and Forsyth Park at Gaston Street, and Montgomery and Price streets. Within its borders are more than 2,350 architecturally and historically significant buildings in a 2 1/2-square-mile area.
The Historic District -- The primary reason to visit Savannah, the Historic District encompasses both the Riverfront and the City Market. It’s officially bordered by the Savannah River and Forsyth Park at Gaston Street, and Montgomery and Price streets. Within its borders are more than 2,350 architecturally and historically significant buildings in a 2 1/2-square-mile area.
Historic District - South
The Historic District -- The primary reason to visit Savannah, the Historic District encompasses both the Riverfront and the City Market. It’s officially bordered by the Savannah River and Forsyth Park at Gaston Street, and Montgomery and Price streets. Within its borders are more than 2,350 architecturally and historically significant buildings in a 2 1/2-square-mile area.
Riverfront -- River Street is where the Historic District meets the Savannah River, though in terms of architecture and atmosphere it is a little different (and lower down) than the more stately streets to the south. Once lined with warehouses holding King Cotton, it has been the subject of massive urban renewal, turning this strip into a row of restaurants, art galleries, shops, and rowdy bars. The original source of the area’s growth was the river, which offered a prime shipping avenue for New World goods bound for European ports. In 1818, about half of Savannah fell under quarantine during a yellow-fever epidemic. River Street never fully recovered and fell into disrepair until its rediscovery in the mid-1970s.
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River Street
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Riverfront -- River Street is where the Historic District meets the Savannah River, though in terms of architecture and atmosphere it is a little different (and lower down) than the more stately streets to the south. Once lined with warehouses holding King Cotton, it has been the subject of massive urban renewal, turning this strip into a row of restaurants, art galleries, shops, and rowdy bars. The original source of the area’s growth was the river, which offered a prime shipping avenue for New World goods bound for European ports. In 1818, about half of Savannah fell under quarantine during a yellow-fever epidemic. River Street never fully recovered and fell into disrepair until its rediscovery in the mid-1970s.
City Market -- Two blocks from River Street and bordering the Savannah River, the City Market district was the former social and business mecca of Savannah (the actual market building was demolished in the 1950s). The city of Savannah decided to save what remained of the district in the 1980s. Today the district comprises a 4-block area of restored warehouses and shop fronts adjacent to Ellis Square, offering everything from antiques to collectibles, including many Savannah-made products. And everything from seafood and pizza to French and Italian cuisine is served here. Live music often fills the nighttime air. Some of the best jazz in the city is presented here in various clubs.
219 W Bryan St
219 West Bryan Street
City Market -- Two blocks from River Street and bordering the Savannah River, the City Market district was the former social and business mecca of Savannah (the actual market building was demolished in the 1950s). The city of Savannah decided to save what remained of the district in the 1980s. Today the district comprises a 4-block area of restored warehouses and shop fronts adjacent to Ellis Square, offering everything from antiques to collectibles, including many Savannah-made products. And everything from seafood and pizza to French and Italian cuisine is served here. Live music often fills the nighttime air. Some of the best jazz in the city is presented here in various clubs.
Victorian District -- The Victorian District, south of the Historic District, holds some of the finest examples of post–Civil War architecture in the Deep South. The district is bounded by Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and by East Broad, Gwinnett, and Anderson streets. Houses in the district are characterized by gingerbread trim, stained-glass windows, and imaginative architectural details. In all, the district encompasses an area of nearly 50 blocks, spread across some 165 acres. The entire district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Most of the two-story homes are wood frame and were constructed in the late 1800s on brick foundations. The district, overflowing from the historic inner core, became the first suburb of Savannah.
Victorian District - West
Victorian District -- The Victorian District, south of the Historic District, holds some of the finest examples of post–Civil War architecture in the Deep South. The district is bounded by Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and by East Broad, Gwinnett, and Anderson streets. Houses in the district are characterized by gingerbread trim, stained-glass windows, and imaginative architectural details. In all, the district encompasses an area of nearly 50 blocks, spread across some 165 acres. The entire district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Most of the two-story homes are wood frame and were constructed in the late 1800s on brick foundations. The district, overflowing from the historic inner core, became the first suburb of Savannah.
City Layout In Savannah, every other street—north, south, west, and east—is punctuated by greenery. The grid of 21 scenic squares was laid out in 1733 by Gen. James Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia. The design—still in use—has been called “one of the world’s most revered city plans.” It’s said that if Savannah didn’t have its history and architecture, it would be worth a visit just to see the city layout. Bull Street is the dividing line between east and west. On the south side are odd-numbered buildings, on the north side even numbered.
Bull Street
City Layout In Savannah, every other street—north, south, west, and east—is punctuated by greenery. The grid of 21 scenic squares was laid out in 1733 by Gen. James Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia. The design—still in use—has been called “one of the world’s most revered city plans.” It’s said that if Savannah didn’t have its history and architecture, it would be worth a visit just to see the city layout. Bull Street is the dividing line between east and west. On the south side are odd-numbered buildings, on the north side even numbered.
Groceries/Alcohol
Groceries, Prepared Meals, Wine
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Whole Foods Market
1815 East Victory Drive
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Groceries, Prepared Meals, Wine
Groceries, Prepared food, Beer & Wine
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Kroger
311 East Gwinnett Street
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Groceries, Prepared food, Beer & Wine
Beer, Wine, Alcohol
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Johnnie Ganem Package Shop
501 Habersham Street
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Beer, Wine, Alcohol
Museums / Historic Places
The Telfair Academy is just short walk away from the Jepson Center, but that short distance covers nearly 200 years of history. The stately two-story mansion, designed by William Jay in the Neoclassical Regency style and built in 1819, is just three historic squares away from Jay’s other masterpiece, the Owens-Thomas House. The Telfair Academy contains three nineteenth-century period rooms and houses nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and European art from the museum’s permanent collection including paintings, works on paper, sculpture, and decorative arts.
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Telfair Academy
121 Barnard Street
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The Telfair Academy is just short walk away from the Jepson Center, but that short distance covers nearly 200 years of history. The stately two-story mansion, designed by William Jay in the Neoclassical Regency style and built in 1819, is just three historic squares away from Jay’s other masterpiece, the Owens-Thomas House. The Telfair Academy contains three nineteenth-century period rooms and houses nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and European art from the museum’s permanent collection including paintings, works on paper, sculpture, and decorative arts.
The Jepson Center links the history preserved by the Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters and Telfair Academy to the future of art and architecture. The strikingly modern building, opened in 2006, is filled with art, activities, and educational opportunities that will encourage learning for generations to come.
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Jepson Center for the Arts
207 West York Street
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The Jepson Center links the history preserved by the Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters and Telfair Academy to the future of art and architecture. The strikingly modern building, opened in 2006, is filled with art, activities, and educational opportunities that will encourage learning for generations to come.
Built as a beautiful Regency style mansion in 1819, the Owens-Thomas House, along with its adjacent gardens, carriage house, and slave quarters, allows visitors to explore the complicated relationships between the most and least powerful people in the city of Savannah in the early 19th century. Only a seven-minute walk from Telfair Museums’ other two sites, this historic home offers a completely different experience. Visitors on our guided tours explore period rooms full of exquisite decorative arts, interactive exhibits for all ages, and historic spaces filled with stories, all while learning about the people, both free and enslaved, who lived and worked on the site 200 years ago.
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Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters
124 Abercorn Street
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Built as a beautiful Regency style mansion in 1819, the Owens-Thomas House, along with its adjacent gardens, carriage house, and slave quarters, allows visitors to explore the complicated relationships between the most and least powerful people in the city of Savannah in the early 19th century. Only a seven-minute walk from Telfair Museums’ other two sites, this historic home offers a completely different experience. Visitors on our guided tours explore period rooms full of exquisite decorative arts, interactive exhibits for all ages, and historic spaces filled with stories, all while learning about the people, both free and enslaved, who lived and worked on the site 200 years ago.
The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace is perhaps the only “house museum” in the nation created specifically for girls to enjoy—though it is loved by everyone! At this unique house museum, owned and operated by Girl Scouts of the USA, visitors can trace the arc of Juliette Gordon Low’s life and the Girl Scout Movement she founded. The house stands as a National Historic Landmark honoring the daughter, debutante, wife, adventurer, and artist who became the first Girl Scout—our beloved Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low. Juliette was born here in 1860, and she lived in and visited the house throughout her life. It was from this very home that she made the famous phone call that marked the beginning of Girl Scouts in 1912, proclaiming, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start tonight!” That call sparked a wildfire in many hearts, inspiring more than 60 million girls to blaze new trails and see limitless potential for their lives through their participation in Girl Scouts.
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Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace
10 East Oglethorpe Avenue
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The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace is perhaps the only “house museum” in the nation created specifically for girls to enjoy—though it is loved by everyone! At this unique house museum, owned and operated by Girl Scouts of the USA, visitors can trace the arc of Juliette Gordon Low’s life and the Girl Scout Movement she founded. The house stands as a National Historic Landmark honoring the daughter, debutante, wife, adventurer, and artist who became the first Girl Scout—our beloved Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low. Juliette was born here in 1860, and she lived in and visited the house throughout her life. It was from this very home that she made the famous phone call that marked the beginning of Girl Scouts in 1912, proclaiming, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start tonight!” That call sparked a wildfire in many hearts, inspiring more than 60 million girls to blaze new trails and see limitless potential for their lives through their participation in Girl Scouts.
The Mercer House was designed by New York architect John S. Norris for General Hugh W. Mercer, great grandfather of Johnny Mercer. Construction of the house began in 1860, was interrupted by the Civil War and was later completed, circa 1868, by the new owner, John Wilder. In 1969, Jim Williams, one of Savannah’s earliest and most dedicated private restorationists, bought the then vacant house and began a two-year restoration. This house is one of the more than 50 houses Mr. Williams saved during his thirty-year career in historic restoration in Savannah and the Lowcountry. Throughout the house you will see furniture and art from Mr. Williams’ private collection including 18th and 19th century furniture, 18th century English and American portraits, drawings from the 17th century and a wide collection of Chinese export porcelain. Previously open only to benefit local historic and charitable organizations, this is the first time the house has been open to the public since its restoration was completed.
Mercer Williams House Museum
429 Bull St
The Mercer House was designed by New York architect John S. Norris for General Hugh W. Mercer, great grandfather of Johnny Mercer. Construction of the house began in 1860, was interrupted by the Civil War and was later completed, circa 1868, by the new owner, John Wilder. In 1969, Jim Williams, one of Savannah’s earliest and most dedicated private restorationists, bought the then vacant house and began a two-year restoration. This house is one of the more than 50 houses Mr. Williams saved during his thirty-year career in historic restoration in Savannah and the Lowcountry. Throughout the house you will see furniture and art from Mr. Williams’ private collection including 18th and 19th century furniture, 18th century English and American portraits, drawings from the 17th century and a wide collection of Chinese export porcelain. Previously open only to benefit local historic and charitable organizations, this is the first time the house has been open to the public since its restoration was completed.
Completed circa 1820 by Isaiah Davenport, this historic home marked the beginning of Savannah’s historic preservation movement. ​ Throughout its 50+ years as a historic site, the Davenport House Museum has treated visitors to intriguing and vivid experiences centered on a legendary Savannah-centric tale of courage and determination.
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Davenport House Museum
324 East State Street
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Completed circa 1820 by Isaiah Davenport, this historic home marked the beginning of Savannah’s historic preservation movement. ​ Throughout its 50+ years as a historic site, the Davenport House Museum has treated visitors to intriguing and vivid experiences centered on a legendary Savannah-centric tale of courage and determination.
National Trust Historic Landmark The Sorrel-Weed House is an exceptional example of the Greek revival style. It was was designed and built by renowned Irish architect Charles B. Cluskey in 1841 for Frances Sorrel, a commission merchant from the West Indies. Regarded as one of Savannah’s most beautiful mansions, the home features a parapet with elliptical arches, a sweeping double entrance and Doric columns on the portico, and balconies on the first story front windows. An oval shaped library with curved wooden doors is of particular interest. This historic treasue was also home to Francis Sorrel’s son, Moxley Sorrel of Civil War fame. Sorrel served as a staff officer to Confederate Lt. General, James Longstreet, and proved himself a hero at the Battle of the Wilderness in May, 1864. Promoted to the rank of Brigadier General in 1864 at the age of 26, he was the youngest general officer in the Confederate army. Robert E. Lee visited the home in 1861 before taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia the following year. The Sorrel-Weed House was designated a state landmark in 1953, the first house in Georgia to be so honored. The house is also a National Trust Historic Landmark.
Sorrel Weed House
6 W Harris St
National Trust Historic Landmark The Sorrel-Weed House is an exceptional example of the Greek revival style. It was was designed and built by renowned Irish architect Charles B. Cluskey in 1841 for Frances Sorrel, a commission merchant from the West Indies. Regarded as one of Savannah’s most beautiful mansions, the home features a parapet with elliptical arches, a sweeping double entrance and Doric columns on the portico, and balconies on the first story front windows. An oval shaped library with curved wooden doors is of particular interest. This historic treasue was also home to Francis Sorrel’s son, Moxley Sorrel of Civil War fame. Sorrel served as a staff officer to Confederate Lt. General, James Longstreet, and proved himself a hero at the Battle of the Wilderness in May, 1864. Promoted to the rank of Brigadier General in 1864 at the age of 26, he was the youngest general officer in the Confederate army. Robert E. Lee visited the home in 1861 before taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia the following year. The Sorrel-Weed House was designated a state landmark in 1953, the first house in Georgia to be so honored. The house is also a National Trust Historic Landmark.
Antiques
SAVANNAH'S MOST INTERESTING SHOP "Walking through this suspended-in-time, stuffed-to-the-gills mansion is a bit like visiting Miss Havisham of Great Expectations, except that here the dusty tramp art and Biedermeier chairs are for sale." Garden and Gun Magazine "If the walls of the Noble Hardee Mansion could talk, they’d have to speak up to be heard over the hoard of antiques jostling for attention in their rooms." Atlas Obscura The "Ikea antidote." The New York Times
Alex Raskin Antiques
441 Bull St
SAVANNAH'S MOST INTERESTING SHOP "Walking through this suspended-in-time, stuffed-to-the-gills mansion is a bit like visiting Miss Havisham of Great Expectations, except that here the dusty tramp art and Biedermeier chairs are for sale." Garden and Gun Magazine "If the walls of the Noble Hardee Mansion could talk, they’d have to speak up to be heard over the hoard of antiques jostling for attention in their rooms." Atlas Obscura The "Ikea antidote." The New York Times
10,000 square feet of fine American, English and French antique furniture, paintings, silver, porcelains, antique and modern oriental carpets, chandeliers and mirrors.
Savannah Galleries
30 East Bryan Street
10,000 square feet of fine American, English and French antique furniture, paintings, silver, porcelains, antique and modern oriental carpets, chandeliers and mirrors.
Seventh Heaven Antiques in Savannah is the insider's secret source. Why? Selection, Service, and Price, of course. It' simple. We have what you want at a price you'll be glad to pay, and back it all up with the most warm, friendly and informed service you're going to find anywhere. Seventh Heaven is the one antiques store in town where knowing Savannah locals stop in weekly to investigate the latest arrivals from exclusive Savannah estates. It is where sharp out-of-state dealers and the most successful interior decorators go first. Why? Because they know they will be warmly welcomed, they will find what they want without wading through mounds of trinkets and reproductions, and they will be given very competitive prices. But, we are the "insider's secret" because you can't find us on a walking tour downtown.
Seventh Heaven Antiques
3104 Skidaway Road
Seventh Heaven Antiques in Savannah is the insider's secret source. Why? Selection, Service, and Price, of course. It' simple. We have what you want at a price you'll be glad to pay, and back it all up with the most warm, friendly and informed service you're going to find anywhere. Seventh Heaven is the one antiques store in town where knowing Savannah locals stop in weekly to investigate the latest arrivals from exclusive Savannah estates. It is where sharp out-of-state dealers and the most successful interior decorators go first. Why? Because they know they will be warmly welcomed, they will find what they want without wading through mounds of trinkets and reproductions, and they will be given very competitive prices. But, we are the "insider's secret" because you can't find us on a walking tour downtown.
Hospitals
Memorial University Medical Center: Emergency Room
4700 Waters Ave
St. Joseph's Hospital
11705 Mercy Boulevard
Candler Hospital: Emergency Room
5353 Reynolds Street
Pharmacy
CVS Pharmacy
119 Bull St