Ugrás a tartalomra

宅東的旅行指南

宅東zaito

宅東的旅行指南

观光
The Tokyo Skytree (東京スカイツリー) is a television broadcasting tower and landmark of Tokyo. It is the centerpiece of the Tokyo Skytree Town in the Sumida City Ward, not far away from Asakusa. With a height of 634 meters (634 can be read as "Musashi", a historic name of the Tokyo Region), it is the tallest structure in Japan and the second tallest in the world at the time of its completion. A large shopping complex with the aquarium is located at its base.
Tokyo Skytree
The Tokyo Skytree (東京スカイツリー) is a television broadcasting tower and landmark of Tokyo. It is the centerpiece of the Tokyo Skytree Town in the Sumida City Ward, not far away from Asakusa. With a height of 634 meters (634 can be read as "Musashi", a historic name of the Tokyo Region), it is the tallest structure in Japan and the second tallest in the world at the time of its completion. A large shopping complex with the aquarium is located at its base.
Sensoji (浅草寺, Sensōji, also known as Asakusa Kannon Temple) is a Buddhist temple located in Asakusa. It is one of Tokyo's most colorful and popular temples. The legend says that in the year 628, two brothers fished a statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, out of the Sumida River, and even though they put the statue back into the river, it always returned to them. Consequently, Sensoji was built nearby for the goddess of Kannon. The temple was completed in 645, making it Tokyo's oldest temple.
Sensō-ji
Sensoji (浅草寺, Sensōji, also known as Asakusa Kannon Temple) is a Buddhist temple located in Asakusa. It is one of Tokyo's most colorful and popular temples. The legend says that in the year 628, two brothers fished a statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, out of the Sumida River, and even though they put the statue back into the river, it always returned to them. Consequently, Sensoji was built nearby for the goddess of Kannon. The temple was completed in 645, making it Tokyo's oldest temple.
Akihabara (秋葉原), also called Akiba after a former local shrine, is a district in central Tokyo that is famous for its many electronics shops. In more recent years, Akihabara has gained recognition as the center of Japan's otaku (diehard fan) culture, and many shops and establishments devoted to anime and manga are now dispersed among the electronic stores in the district. On Sundays, Chuo Dori, the main street through the district, is closed to car traffic from 13:00 to 18:00 (until 17:00 from October through March). Akihabara has been undergoing major redevelopment over the years, including the renovation and expansion of Akihabara Station and the construction of new buildings in its proximity. Among these newly opened buildings were a huge Yodobashi electronics store and the Akihabara Crossfield, a business complex with the aim of promoting Akihabara as a center for global electronics technology and trade.
Akihabara
Akihabara (秋葉原), also called Akiba after a former local shrine, is a district in central Tokyo that is famous for its many electronics shops. In more recent years, Akihabara has gained recognition as the center of Japan's otaku (diehard fan) culture, and many shops and establishments devoted to anime and manga are now dispersed among the electronic stores in the district. On Sundays, Chuo Dori, the main street through the district, is closed to car traffic from 13:00 to 18:00 (until 17:00 from October through March). Akihabara has been undergoing major redevelopment over the years, including the renovation and expansion of Akihabara Station and the construction of new buildings in its proximity. Among these newly opened buildings were a huge Yodobashi electronics store and the Akihabara Crossfield, a business complex with the aim of promoting Akihabara as a center for global electronics technology and trade.
Tokyo DisneySea is a fantasy theme park in Tokyo Disney Resort that is unique to Japan. Inspired by the myths and legends of the sea, Tokyo DisneySea is made up of seven themed ports of call: Mediterranean Harbor, Mysterious Island, Mermaid Lagoon, Arabian Coast, Lost River Delta, Port Discovery and American Waterfront. While suitable for all ages, Tokyo DisneySea was designed to specifically also appeal to a more grown up audience. The park addresses the Japanese visitors' strong interest in good food by providing a wider selection of table service restaurants than Tokyo Disneyland and by serving alcoholic beverages, which are unavailable at the neighboring park.
Tokyo DisneySea
Tokyo DisneySea is a fantasy theme park in Tokyo Disney Resort that is unique to Japan. Inspired by the myths and legends of the sea, Tokyo DisneySea is made up of seven themed ports of call: Mediterranean Harbor, Mysterious Island, Mermaid Lagoon, Arabian Coast, Lost River Delta, Port Discovery and American Waterfront. While suitable for all ages, Tokyo DisneySea was designed to specifically also appeal to a more grown up audience. The park addresses the Japanese visitors' strong interest in good food by providing a wider selection of table service restaurants than Tokyo Disneyland and by serving alcoholic beverages, which are unavailable at the neighboring park.
Tokyo Disneyland is a theme park based on the films produced by Walt Disney. It was opened in 1983 as the first Disney theme park outside of the United States. Modeled after Disneyland in California and the Magic Kingdom in Florida, Tokyo Disneyland is made up of seven themed lands and features seasonal decorations and parades.
Tokyo Disneyland
Tokyo Disneyland is a theme park based on the films produced by Walt Disney. It was opened in 1983 as the first Disney theme park outside of the United States. Modeled after Disneyland in California and the Magic Kingdom in Florida, Tokyo Disneyland is made up of seven themed lands and features seasonal decorations and parades.
The Ghibli Museum (三鷹の森ジブリ美術館, Mitaka no Mori Ghibli Bijutsukan) is the animation and art museum of Miyazaki Hayao's Studio Ghibli, one of Japan's most famous animation studios. They have produced many feature-length films with worldwide distribution such as My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away and Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea. Located in Mitaka, just outside of central Tokyo, the museum is a must-see for fans of the films. The museum itself is whimsically designed in the distinct style of the studio's films, and many of their famous characters are there, including a life-sized robot from "Castle in the Sky" in the rooftop garden. The first floor of the museum exhibits the history and techniques of animation and has as a small theater which shows short movies by Studio Ghibli that are exclusive to the museum. The second floor houses special temporary exhibitions. The museum also has a cafe, children's play area, a rooftop garden, and a gift shop.
Ghibli Museum
The Ghibli Museum (三鷹の森ジブリ美術館, Mitaka no Mori Ghibli Bijutsukan) is the animation and art museum of Miyazaki Hayao's Studio Ghibli, one of Japan's most famous animation studios. They have produced many feature-length films with worldwide distribution such as My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away and Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea. Located in Mitaka, just outside of central Tokyo, the museum is a must-see for fans of the films. The museum itself is whimsically designed in the distinct style of the studio's films, and many of their famous characters are there, including a life-sized robot from "Castle in the Sky" in the rooftop garden. The first floor of the museum exhibits the history and techniques of animation and has as a small theater which shows short movies by Studio Ghibli that are exclusive to the museum. The second floor houses special temporary exhibitions. The museum also has a cafe, children's play area, a rooftop garden, and a gift shop.
The Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum opened its doors in March 1993 as a space to reflect on the history and culture of Edo-Tokyo and envision the city and life of the future. Housed in a unique building modeled after an elevated-floor type warehouse, the museum has been a landmark and popular tourist attraction in Tokyo since its opening. The permanent exhibition, showcasing original objects and replicas, offers visitors a journey through the 400-year history of Edo-Tokyo since Tokugawa Ieyasu entered Edo. In addition to the permanent exhibition, the museum holds special exhibitions at the first-floor gallery five to six times a year and carries out various other events, including lectures and workshops on the history and culture of Edo-Tokyo. We hope that the museum can be Tokyo’s center for the creation of new culture and a place of respite for visitors. Special Exhibition Samurai – Peacekeeping Contributors in Edo Period 2019.09.14(Sat)〜2019.11.04(Mon) Opening time: Sun 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM Tue - Fri 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM Sat 9:30 AM - 7:30 PM
Edo-Tokyo Museum
The Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum opened its doors in March 1993 as a space to reflect on the history and culture of Edo-Tokyo and envision the city and life of the future. Housed in a unique building modeled after an elevated-floor type warehouse, the museum has been a landmark and popular tourist attraction in Tokyo since its opening. The permanent exhibition, showcasing original objects and replicas, offers visitors a journey through the 400-year history of Edo-Tokyo since Tokugawa Ieyasu entered Edo. In addition to the permanent exhibition, the museum holds special exhibitions at the first-floor gallery five to six times a year and carries out various other events, including lectures and workshops on the history and culture of Edo-Tokyo. We hope that the museum can be Tokyo’s center for the creation of new culture and a place of respite for visitors. Special Exhibition Samurai – Peacekeeping Contributors in Edo Period 2019.09.14(Sat)〜2019.11.04(Mon) Opening time: Sun 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM Tue - Fri 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM Sat 9:30 AM - 7:30 PM
The Tobacco and Salt Museum is in Sumida-Ku not far from Kinshicho to the south-east and the Tokyo Skytree to the north. (It moved from its previous location not far from Shibuya Station to its new site in April 2015.) The Tobacco and Salt Museum is a modern, high-tech facility that looks at the various uses of tobacco and salt throughout history, both of which were government monopolies in Japan until recently. Open 10 am to 6 pm (last admission: 5:30 pm). Closed Monday. Admission is 100 yen for adults, 50 yen for students.
Tobacco & Salt Museum
The Tobacco and Salt Museum is in Sumida-Ku not far from Kinshicho to the south-east and the Tokyo Skytree to the north. (It moved from its previous location not far from Shibuya Station to its new site in April 2015.) The Tobacco and Salt Museum is a modern, high-tech facility that looks at the various uses of tobacco and salt throughout history, both of which were government monopolies in Japan until recently. Open 10 am to 6 pm (last admission: 5:30 pm). Closed Monday. Admission is 100 yen for adults, 50 yen for students.
Standing 333 meters high in the center of Tokyo, Tokyo Tower (東京タワー) is the world's tallest, self-supported steel tower and 13 meters taller than its model, the Eiffel Tower. A symbol of Japan's post-war rebirth as a major economic power, Tokyo Tower was the country's tallest structure from its completion in 1958 until 2012 when it was surpassed by the Tokyo Skytree. In addition to being a popular tourist spot, Tokyo Tower serves as a broadcast antenna. The closest subway stations to Tokyo Tower are Onarimon Station on the Mita Subway Line, Akabanebashi Station on the Oedo Subway Line and Kamiyacho on the Hibiya Subway Line, which are all about a 5-10 minute walk from the tower. Alternatively, you can reach the tower in about a 15-20 minute walk from Hamamatsucho Station on the JR Yamanote Line or Daimon Station on the Asakusa or Oedo subway lines.
Tokyo Tower
Standing 333 meters high in the center of Tokyo, Tokyo Tower (東京タワー) is the world's tallest, self-supported steel tower and 13 meters taller than its model, the Eiffel Tower. A symbol of Japan's post-war rebirth as a major economic power, Tokyo Tower was the country's tallest structure from its completion in 1958 until 2012 when it was surpassed by the Tokyo Skytree. In addition to being a popular tourist spot, Tokyo Tower serves as a broadcast antenna. The closest subway stations to Tokyo Tower are Onarimon Station on the Mita Subway Line, Akabanebashi Station on the Oedo Subway Line and Kamiyacho on the Hibiya Subway Line, which are all about a 5-10 minute walk from the tower. Alternatively, you can reach the tower in about a 15-20 minute walk from Hamamatsucho Station on the JR Yamanote Line or Daimon Station on the Asakusa or Oedo subway lines.
The current Imperial Palace (皇居, Kōkyo) is located on the former site of Edo Castle, a large park area surrounded by moats and massive stone walls in the center of Tokyo, a short walk from Tokyo Station. It is the residence of Japan's Imperial Family.
Imperial Palace
The current Imperial Palace (皇居, Kōkyo) is located on the former site of Edo Castle, a large park area surrounded by moats and massive stone walls in the center of Tokyo, a short walk from Tokyo Station. It is the residence of Japan's Imperial Family.
The Ginza (銀座) is Tokyo's most famous upmarket shopping, dining, and entertainment district, featuring numerous department stores, boutiques, art galleries, restaurants, night clubs and cafes. One square meter of land in the district's center is worth over ten million yen, making it one of the most expensive real estate in Japan. It is where you can find the infamous $10 cups of coffee and where virtually every leading brand name in fashion and cosmetics has a presence.
Ginza
The Ginza (銀座) is Tokyo's most famous upmarket shopping, dining, and entertainment district, featuring numerous department stores, boutiques, art galleries, restaurants, night clubs and cafes. One square meter of land in the district's center is worth over ten million yen, making it one of the most expensive real estate in Japan. It is where you can find the infamous $10 cups of coffee and where virtually every leading brand name in fashion and cosmetics has a presence.
邻近地区
Asakusa (浅草) is the center of Tokyo's shitamachi (literally "low city"), one of Tokyo's districts, where an atmosphere of the Tokyo of past decades survives. Asakusa's main attraction is Sensoji, a very popular Buddhist temple, built in the 7th century. The temple is approached via the Nakamise, a shopping street that has been providing temple visitors with a variety of traditional, local snacks and tourist souvenirs for centuries. Asakusa can easily be explored on foot. Alternatively, you can consider a guided tour on a rickshaw (jinrikisha, literally "man-powered vehicle"). A 30-minute tour for two persons costs around 9000 yen. Shorter and longer courses are also available.
Asakusa
Asakusa (浅草) is the center of Tokyo's shitamachi (literally "low city"), one of Tokyo's districts, where an atmosphere of the Tokyo of past decades survives. Asakusa's main attraction is Sensoji, a very popular Buddhist temple, built in the 7th century. The temple is approached via the Nakamise, a shopping street that has been providing temple visitors with a variety of traditional, local snacks and tourist souvenirs for centuries. Asakusa can easily be explored on foot. Alternatively, you can consider a guided tour on a rickshaw (jinrikisha, literally "man-powered vehicle"). A 30-minute tour for two persons costs around 9000 yen. Shorter and longer courses are also available.
Shinjuku (新宿) is one of the 23 city wards of Tokyo, but the name commonly refers to just the large entertainment, business and shopping area around Shinjuku Station. Shinjuku Station is the world's busiest railway station, handling more than two million passengers every day. It is served by about a dozen railway and subway lines, including the JR Yamanote Line. Shinjuku is also one of Tokyo's major stops for long-distance highway buses. A large bus terminal, named Busta Shinjuku, is conveniently located on top of the railway station. West of the station is Shinjuku's skyscraper district, home to many of Tokyo's tallest buildings, including several premier hotels and the twin towers of the Metropolitan Government Office, whose observation decks are open to the public for free. Northeast of the station lies Kabukicho, Japan's largest and wildest red light district, while department stores, subterranean malls and electronic shops surround Shinjuku Station on all four sides, including the redeveloped Southern Terrace.
Shinjuku City
Shinjuku (新宿) is one of the 23 city wards of Tokyo, but the name commonly refers to just the large entertainment, business and shopping area around Shinjuku Station. Shinjuku Station is the world's busiest railway station, handling more than two million passengers every day. It is served by about a dozen railway and subway lines, including the JR Yamanote Line. Shinjuku is also one of Tokyo's major stops for long-distance highway buses. A large bus terminal, named Busta Shinjuku, is conveniently located on top of the railway station. West of the station is Shinjuku's skyscraper district, home to many of Tokyo's tallest buildings, including several premier hotels and the twin towers of the Metropolitan Government Office, whose observation decks are open to the public for free. Northeast of the station lies Kabukicho, Japan's largest and wildest red light district, while department stores, subterranean malls and electronic shops surround Shinjuku Station on all four sides, including the redeveloped Southern Terrace.
Ueno Park (上野公園, Ueno Kōen) is a large public park next to Ueno Station in central Tokyo. It is famous for the many museums found on its grounds, especially the Tokyo National Museum, the National Museum for Western Art, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and the National Science Museum. It is also home to Ueno Zoo, Japan's first zoological garden. Additionally, Ueno Park is one of Tokyo's most popular and lively cherry blossom spots with more than 1000 cherry trees lining its central pathway. The cherry blossoms are usually in bloom during late March and early April and attract large numbers of hanami (cherry blossom viewing) parties.
Ueno Park Street
Ueno Park (上野公園, Ueno Kōen) is a large public park next to Ueno Station in central Tokyo. It is famous for the many museums found on its grounds, especially the Tokyo National Museum, the National Museum for Western Art, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and the National Science Museum. It is also home to Ueno Zoo, Japan's first zoological garden. Additionally, Ueno Park is one of Tokyo's most popular and lively cherry blossom spots with more than 1000 cherry trees lining its central pathway. The cherry blossoms are usually in bloom during late March and early April and attract large numbers of hanami (cherry blossom viewing) parties.
Shibuya (渋谷) is one of the twenty-three city wards of Tokyo, but often refers to just the popular shopping and entertainment area found around Shibuya Station. In this regard, Shibuya is one of Tokyo's most colorful and busy districts, packed with shopping, dining and nightclubs serving swarms of visitors that come to the district everyday. Shibuya is a center for youth fashion and culture, and its streets are the birthplace to many of Japan's fashion and entertainment trends. Over a dozen major department store branches can be found around the area catering to all types of shoppers. Most of the area's large department and fashion stores belong to either Tokyu or Seibu, two competing corporations. A prominent landmark of Shibuya is the large intersection in front of the station's Hachiko Exit. The intersection is heavily decorated by neon advertisements and giant video screens and gets flooded by pedestrians each time the crossing light turns green, making it a popular photo and movie filming spot. Shibuya Station and surroundings are undergoing major redevelopment over the coming years. On the east side of the station, a new large culture, shopping and office complex, the Shibuya Hikarie, opened in spring 2012. A year later, the Tokyu Toyoko Line platforms were moved underground, enabling through-traffic with the Fukutoshin Subway Line. Furthermore, a major redevelopment of the Shibuya Station building is now underway, including the construction of a new, 230 meter tall skyscraper with an open-air observation deck to be opened on November 1, 2019 and the move of the platforms of the JR Saikyo Line next to the platforms of the JR Yamanote Line. In addition, the pedestrian plaza on the west side of the station will be enlarged and made more pedestrian friendly in combination with a rearrangement of the bus and taxi stops. The entire project is scheduled for completion around 2027.
Shibuya
Shibuya (渋谷) is one of the twenty-three city wards of Tokyo, but often refers to just the popular shopping and entertainment area found around Shibuya Station. In this regard, Shibuya is one of Tokyo's most colorful and busy districts, packed with shopping, dining and nightclubs serving swarms of visitors that come to the district everyday. Shibuya is a center for youth fashion and culture, and its streets are the birthplace to many of Japan's fashion and entertainment trends. Over a dozen major department store branches can be found around the area catering to all types of shoppers. Most of the area's large department and fashion stores belong to either Tokyu or Seibu, two competing corporations. A prominent landmark of Shibuya is the large intersection in front of the station's Hachiko Exit. The intersection is heavily decorated by neon advertisements and giant video screens and gets flooded by pedestrians each time the crossing light turns green, making it a popular photo and movie filming spot. Shibuya Station and surroundings are undergoing major redevelopment over the coming years. On the east side of the station, a new large culture, shopping and office complex, the Shibuya Hikarie, opened in spring 2012. A year later, the Tokyu Toyoko Line platforms were moved underground, enabling through-traffic with the Fukutoshin Subway Line. Furthermore, a major redevelopment of the Shibuya Station building is now underway, including the construction of a new, 230 meter tall skyscraper with an open-air observation deck to be opened on November 1, 2019 and the move of the platforms of the JR Saikyo Line next to the platforms of the JR Yamanote Line. In addition, the pedestrian plaza on the west side of the station will be enlarged and made more pedestrian friendly in combination with a rearrangement of the bus and taxi stops. The entire project is scheduled for completion around 2027.
美食所在地
Matsuya, opening 24/7, is a kind of Japanese fast-food chain that is cheap, quick, convenient, and 100% painless for the traveler who just wants food without the hassle. It is best known for its gyudon, a simple Japanese meal of shredded beef and onions served over a bowl of rice. The best part is, Matsuya is everywhere. Once you learn to identify its circles-on-a-yellow-background logo, you’ll find Matsuyas everywhere you go, including in or near most train stations.
Matsuya
Matsuya, opening 24/7, is a kind of Japanese fast-food chain that is cheap, quick, convenient, and 100% painless for the traveler who just wants food without the hassle. It is best known for its gyudon, a simple Japanese meal of shredded beef and onions served over a bowl of rice. The best part is, Matsuya is everywhere. Once you learn to identify its circles-on-a-yellow-background logo, you’ll find Matsuyas everywhere you go, including in or near most train stations.
The Asahi Beer Hall (a.k.a. Super Dry Hall, or Flamme d'Or) is one of the buildings of the Asahi Breweries headquarters located on the east bank of the Sumida River in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It was designed by French designer Philippe Starck and was completed in 1989. It is considered one of Tokyo's most recognizable modern structures.[1] The shape of the building is that of a beer glass, designed to complement the neighboring golden beer mug-shaped building housing the Asahi Breweries offices. The building is a 3 minute-walk from Asakusa Station, on the opposite side of the Sumida River.
Asahi Beer Headquarters
The Asahi Beer Hall (a.k.a. Super Dry Hall, or Flamme d'Or) is one of the buildings of the Asahi Breweries headquarters located on the east bank of the Sumida River in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It was designed by French designer Philippe Starck and was completed in 1989. It is considered one of Tokyo's most recognizable modern structures.[1] The shape of the building is that of a beer glass, designed to complement the neighboring golden beer mug-shaped building housing the Asahi Breweries offices. The building is a 3 minute-walk from Asakusa Station, on the opposite side of the Sumida River.
Shopping Mall
Conveniently located in front of JR Kinshicho Station, Arcakit Kinshicho is a one-stop shopping destination for shopping and personal errands with a grocery store, which is convenient for daily use, and major retailers for fashion and general merchandise. On 6 or 7 floors you are presented with quality products ranging from the basics to sophistication, even a super large Daiso seems to have more and better quality products. Down in the basement, the supermarket has such a wide array of prepared ( ready-to-eat ) food that you will quickly fill your shopping basket. Opening time: 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Arcakit Kinshicho
Conveniently located in front of JR Kinshicho Station, Arcakit Kinshicho is a one-stop shopping destination for shopping and personal errands with a grocery store, which is convenient for daily use, and major retailers for fashion and general merchandise. On 6 or 7 floors you are presented with quality products ranging from the basics to sophistication, even a super large Daiso seems to have more and better quality products. Down in the basement, the supermarket has such a wide array of prepared ( ready-to-eat ) food that you will quickly fill your shopping basket. Opening time: 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Tokyo Solamachi (lit. "Tokyo Sky Town") is the large shopping, dining, and entertainment complex at the base of the Tokyo Skytree. It features over 300 established and original shops and restaurants and would be well worth a visit even without Japan's tallest tower on top of it. Solamachi offers a wide variety of shops that include many unique establishments specialized in goods such as salt from across Japan and the world, food samples and traditional Tokyo crafts. An entire floor with original souvenir shops offering character goods, Japanese interior design and snacks, should be of particular interest to foreign tourists. Of course, there are also official Tokyo Skytree Shops. The complex also houses a large food market, food court and four floors filled with interesting restaurants, including the two top floors of the Skytree East Building that enjoy nice views onto the Skytree. Additional time can be spent at the attractive Sumida Aquarium, the Tenku planetarium (no English provided) and in the multiple small green spaces and terraces found across the complex. The Postal Museum was newly opened in March 2014 on the ninth floor of Solamachi East. It has a wide collection of stamps from all over the world, as well as interactive displays and exhibits showing the history of postal services in Japan. Opening time: Shops: 10:00 to 21:00 Restaurants: 11:00 to 23:00
Tokyo Solamachi
Tokyo Solamachi (lit. "Tokyo Sky Town") is the large shopping, dining, and entertainment complex at the base of the Tokyo Skytree. It features over 300 established and original shops and restaurants and would be well worth a visit even without Japan's tallest tower on top of it. Solamachi offers a wide variety of shops that include many unique establishments specialized in goods such as salt from across Japan and the world, food samples and traditional Tokyo crafts. An entire floor with original souvenir shops offering character goods, Japanese interior design and snacks, should be of particular interest to foreign tourists. Of course, there are also official Tokyo Skytree Shops. The complex also houses a large food market, food court and four floors filled with interesting restaurants, including the two top floors of the Skytree East Building that enjoy nice views onto the Skytree. Additional time can be spent at the attractive Sumida Aquarium, the Tenku planetarium (no English provided) and in the multiple small green spaces and terraces found across the complex. The Postal Museum was newly opened in March 2014 on the ninth floor of Solamachi East. It has a wide collection of stamps from all over the world, as well as interactive displays and exhibits showing the history of postal services in Japan. Opening time: Shops: 10:00 to 21:00 Restaurants: 11:00 to 23:00
Opened in spring 2017, Ginza Six is the Ginza district's largest shopping complex. Besides many floors of cosmetics and fashion, the complex offers interesting floors devoted to foods and interior design, a large Tsutaya bookshop specializing in art publications, a pleasant rooftop garden and a Noh theater in its basement. Opening hours: Daily 10:30 to 20:30 (restaurants 11:00 to 23:30)
Ginza Six
Opened in spring 2017, Ginza Six is the Ginza district's largest shopping complex. Besides many floors of cosmetics and fashion, the complex offers interesting floors devoted to foods and interior design, a large Tsutaya bookshop specializing in art publications, a pleasant rooftop garden and a Noh theater in its basement. Opening hours: Daily 10:30 to 20:30 (restaurants 11:00 to 23:30)
Amazing things to do!!!
This pokemon specialty store is located in the Skytree Town Solamachi. Offering a variety of pokemon merchandise and limited edition goods, this shop is popular with Pokemon fans.
Pokemon Center Sky Tree Town
This pokemon specialty store is located in the Skytree Town Solamachi. Offering a variety of pokemon merchandise and limited edition goods, this shop is popular with Pokemon fans.
The Kabukiza is one of the best places to see kabuki, featuring plays almost every day. The building was reconstructed and reopened in April 2013. It closely resembles its predecessor except for a skyscraper that now stands above it.
Kabuki-za Theatre
The Kabukiza is one of the best places to see kabuki, featuring plays almost every day. The building was reconstructed and reopened in April 2013. It closely resembles its predecessor except for a skyscraper that now stands above it.
The Toei Animation Museum consists of a single, spacious exhibition room with a small number of displays. Toei is a leading producer of anime series and movies, including animated versions of popular manga such as Dragon Ball and Sailor Moon. A 15-minute walk from Oizumi Gakuen Station along the Seibu Ikebukuro Line Hours: 10:00 to 17:00 (entry until 16:30) Closed: Wednesdays, New Year holidays Admission: Free
Toei Animation Museum
The Toei Animation Museum consists of a single, spacious exhibition room with a small number of displays. Toei is a leading producer of anime series and movies, including animated versions of popular manga such as Dragon Ball and Sailor Moon. A 15-minute walk from Oizumi Gakuen Station along the Seibu Ikebukuro Line Hours: 10:00 to 17:00 (entry until 16:30) Closed: Wednesdays, New Year holidays Admission: Free
The beautifully designed Sumida Aquarium opened in May 2012 at the base of the Tokyo Skytree. It is relatively small, but features some outstanding exhibits, including a unique penguin cage and attractively presented tanks with sea life from the waters around Tokyo, including the Izu and Ogasawara Islands. Short walk from Tokyo Skytree Station or Oshiage Station Hours: 9:00 to 21:00 (entry until 20:00) Admission: 2050 yen
Sumida Aquarium
The beautifully designed Sumida Aquarium opened in May 2012 at the base of the Tokyo Skytree. It is relatively small, but features some outstanding exhibits, including a unique penguin cage and attractively presented tanks with sea life from the waters around Tokyo, including the Izu and Ogasawara Islands. Short walk from Tokyo Skytree Station or Oshiage Station Hours: 9:00 to 21:00 (entry until 20:00) Admission: 2050 yen

Várossal kapcsolatos tanácsok

Közlekedés
Buy a Pasmo or Suica card
Suica and Pasmo can almost be used interchangeably. The only difference is that they are sold by different companies. Pasmo are sold at any ticket vending machine at Tokyo subway stations whereas Suica are only available at JR EAST stations. Both machines have English instructions. But if you’re taking a train from the airport to Tokyo city center, you can buy either card at Narita and Haneda airports. You can even use them to make small purchases in convenience stores and vending machines! One card costs as little as 1000 yen (500 yen for deposit, 500 yen credit). You can top up as you go.
Közlekedés
Use Google Maps and HyperDia to plan your trip
To navigate within Tokyo city, Google Maps is super useful. It displays the best route with price and travel time. HyperDia is another great tool you can use, especially for train travel. It displays detailed timetable and compares routes and prices. Besides the web-based version, it also has an app for iOS and Android.
Hasznos kifejezések
Learn some basic Japanese
Below is a list of useful words and phrases for your survival in Japan: Hello = [konnichiwa] Yes = [hai] No = [ie] Thank you = [arigato gozaimasu] Excuse me = [sumimasen] Pro tip: Download Google Translate app – it is a handy tool to have when you need instant translation between Japanese and English.
Szokások és kultúra
No tipping
One of the things you need to know about Japan is that tipping is not a common practice. Actually, leaving a tip can be seen as demeaning and disrespectful to the server.
Szokások és kultúra
Enjoy the incredible wonder of Japanese electronic toilets
The very first thing you’ll notice when you arrive in Japan is the electronic toilets. These hi-tech toilets are EVERYWHERE and will amaze you with their remarkable functionality! What exactly can they do? The sophisticated toilets come equipped with an array of smart functions, including a heated seat (super great for winter!), water sprays for front and posterior wash (with adjustable position and water strength), noise maker (for privacy), and air-drying.
Szokások és kultúra
Stay on the left side
In Tokyo, people walk on the left-hand side, just like road traffic. On escalators, it is a common, unspoken rule to stand on the left and leave the right side for those who want to climb the steps. Exceptions exist in some metro stations though. To avoid running into other pedestrians, always check the signs!
Szokások és kultúra
Tap water is safe to drink
It’s perfectly safe to drink from the tap!
Szokások és kultúra
There are very few trashcans in Tokyo
Carry a plastic bag to gather your trash while exploring.
Kihagyhatatlan
Shop at Akihabara Electric Town
This is the Tsukiji Market of the electronics world. You can find pretty much anything you’ve ever imagined, as well as all the things you’ve never even dreamed of. Many up-and-coming electronics are tested here. The area has a very futuristic feel to it, with tons of bright lights and huge billboards. It looks like something out of a sci-fi movie. There are also lots of local artists selling their music here too.
Spórolási lehetőségek
Skip the taxis
Since cabs can be expensive (they have a 475 JPY starting fare), use the public transportation to save money. It goes everywhere and late into the night!
Spórolási lehetőségek
Eat at 7-Eleven
The 7-Eleven, Family Mart, and other corner stores have a lot of pre-set meals for 120-370 JPY that make for a cheap lunch option. Additionally, supermarkets also have many set meals at similar prices. You can also find a lot of cheap meals at the major bus/train stations, as well (such as curry, ramen, and donburi). Even the locals eat here.
Közlekedés
Luggage storage options
Coin lockers are everywhere and can always be found at train stations. They come in Small (¥300), Medium (¥400), and Large size (¥500-¥800), though the per-day prices may vary. Unfortunately, large-wheeled suitcases won’t fit inside these lockers, and this is why we always recommend traveling light.
Gyerekkel utazók
Roppongi and Akasaka areas are family-friendly
These areas have family-friendly shopping complexes such as Roppongi Hills and Tokyo Midtown. Your kids will also enjoy Robot Park, the Mori Art Museum, and numerous family-friendly cafes and restaurants.