Ugrás a tartalomra

La guida di Rossana

Rossana

La guida di Rossana

Visite turistiche
Dornes is situated on a peninsula on the right bank of the River Zêzere in Portugal. Its beauty and natural surroundings, river and mountains, the tranquility it offers, make it a paradise still possible to be found. With an unusual pentagonal layout, the tower in the village of Dornes was built by the Knights Templar on the banks of the River Zêzere as a watchtower and defensive bastion for the region, during the Christian Reconquest. Built from limestone and slate, on the site of a former Roman tower, the Tower has various military symbols on the edge of the doorway, deriving from its former defensive function. In the 16th century, in a more peaceful period, it was adapted into a belltower for the neighbouring mother church. Overlooking the waters of the reservoir of Castelo de Bode, the Tower of Dornes today forms part of a spectacular landscape and constitutes one of the most important sightseeing spots in the region.
Nossa Senhora do Pranto
Dornes is situated on a peninsula on the right bank of the River Zêzere in Portugal. Its beauty and natural surroundings, river and mountains, the tranquility it offers, make it a paradise still possible to be found. With an unusual pentagonal layout, the tower in the village of Dornes was built by the Knights Templar on the banks of the River Zêzere as a watchtower and defensive bastion for the region, during the Christian Reconquest. Built from limestone and slate, on the site of a former Roman tower, the Tower has various military symbols on the edge of the doorway, deriving from its former defensive function. In the 16th century, in a more peaceful period, it was adapted into a belltower for the neighbouring mother church. Overlooking the waters of the reservoir of Castelo de Bode, the Tower of Dornes today forms part of a spectacular landscape and constitutes one of the most important sightseeing spots in the region.
Admission on Sunday and holidays until 14h is free Indirizzo: Igreja do Castelo Templário, 2300 Tomar Data di apertura: 15-20 Telefono: 249 315 089 Stili architettonici: Architettura gotica, Architettura romanica, Architettura rinascimentale, Stile manuelino Architetti: João de Castilho, Diogo de Arruda, Diogo de Torralva, Filippo Terzi Tomar Castle and the Convent of Christ - headquarters for the religious and military orders of the Temple and of Christ - were awarded the UNESCO Heritage of Mankind classification and enrolled in UNESCO´s list of World Heritage in 1983. The criteria that ruled its classification took especially into account the Templar´s Charola and the unusual western window of the Manueline nave - its construction extends and prolongs past the castle its own rotunda, the Knight´s primitive oratorium.
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Convent of Christ
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Admission on Sunday and holidays until 14h is free Indirizzo: Igreja do Castelo Templário, 2300 Tomar Data di apertura: 15-20 Telefono: 249 315 089 Stili architettonici: Architettura gotica, Architettura romanica, Architettura rinascimentale, Stile manuelino Architetti: João de Castilho, Diogo de Arruda, Diogo de Torralva, Filippo Terzi Tomar Castle and the Convent of Christ - headquarters for the religious and military orders of the Temple and of Christ - were awarded the UNESCO Heritage of Mankind classification and enrolled in UNESCO´s list of World Heritage in 1983. The criteria that ruled its classification took especially into account the Templar´s Charola and the unusual western window of the Manueline nave - its construction extends and prolongs past the castle its own rotunda, the Knight´s primitive oratorium.
https://goo.gl/maps/efmCHhUbZmydFVYk7
Moinho Hexagonal de Avecasta
https://goo.gl/maps/efmCHhUbZmydFVYk7
https://goo.gl/maps/Dne4Yx1naaLKNH3S9
Gruta de Avecasta (Monumento de Interesse Público)
https://goo.gl/maps/Dne4Yx1naaLKNH3S9
https://goo.gl/maps/dZkooDJujhH4ZGMr5
Fluvial Agroal beach
https://goo.gl/maps/dZkooDJujhH4ZGMr5
https://goo.gl/maps/7gUsoNDEqa7h5oLT8
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Fragas de São Simão
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https://goo.gl/maps/7gUsoNDEqa7h5oLT8
https://youtu.be/uyfOb5_cQ7Q FIRST SUNDAY OF THE MONTH Miranda do Corvo Flea Market / José Falcão Square / 9h00 to 17h00.
Miranda do Corvo
https://youtu.be/uyfOb5_cQ7Q FIRST SUNDAY OF THE MONTH Miranda do Corvo Flea Market / José Falcão Square / 9h00 to 17h00.
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Aqueduc des Pegões
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Castle of Ourem
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Coimbra
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LAGO AZUL
River Beach Penedo Furado
Set in the lush countryside southwest of Coimbra, this is Portugal’s largest and most impressive Roman site. Ancient Conímbriga was an important city in the Roman province of Lusitania and its ruins are extensive and wonderfully well preserved. Highlights include villas paved with elaborate floor mosaics – in particular the Casa dos Repuxos (House of Fountains) – and a 3rd-century defensive wall. To get your head around Conímbriga's fascinating history, start (or finish) at the small museum near the entrance. Here you can browse finds unearthed at the site, including mosaics, sculptural fragments, coins, jewellery and everyday household items. There’s also a scale model of the forum which puts flesh on the skeletal remains you’ll see outside. Conímbriga’s origins date to Celtic times (briga is a Celtic term for a defended area). But it was under the Romans, who arrived in the 2nd century BC, that it blossomed, thanks, in part, to its strategic position on the main route between Lisbon (Olisipo) and Braga (Bracara Augusta). After a golden age in the 1st and 2nd centuries, it eventually fell prey to barbarian attacks and, in 468 AD, it was captured by Germanic Suebi forces. Many citizens fled to nearby Aeminius (Coimbra) – thereby saving the city from destruction. As you enter the ruins, you’ll soon find a massive wall rising in front of you. Dating to the 3rd century, this was built to keep out the by-now threatening barbarians and originally ran right through the city centre – much of the city’s residential area was simply abandoned. Under the walls are a series of mosaic-floored villas, including the Casa dos Esqueletos (House of Skeletons) and Casa da Cruz Suástica (House of the Swastika) – to the Romans the swastika was a symbol of good luck. Over the wall, the Casa de Cantaber was the city’s largest private villa. You’ll find the most impressive mosaics in the 1st-century Casa dos Repuxos. These vivid illustrations, set around a small central garden, depict the four seasons and various hunting scenes. Other highlights include the remnants of the Grandes Termas do Sul (Great Southern Baths) one of the city’s several baths complexes; part of a 3km-long aqueduct; and the forum, which was originally surrounded by covered porticoes. To get to the site by public transport, Transdev runs buses from near Coimbra A station to the ruins (€2.55, 45 minutes, three times daily). You’ll need to check the precise hours, though, as they change seasonally. Coimbra’s turismo can provide timetables.
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Ruínas de Conímbriga
7 R. das Ruínas
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Set in the lush countryside southwest of Coimbra, this is Portugal’s largest and most impressive Roman site. Ancient Conímbriga was an important city in the Roman province of Lusitania and its ruins are extensive and wonderfully well preserved. Highlights include villas paved with elaborate floor mosaics – in particular the Casa dos Repuxos (House of Fountains) – and a 3rd-century defensive wall. To get your head around Conímbriga's fascinating history, start (or finish) at the small museum near the entrance. Here you can browse finds unearthed at the site, including mosaics, sculptural fragments, coins, jewellery and everyday household items. There’s also a scale model of the forum which puts flesh on the skeletal remains you’ll see outside. Conímbriga’s origins date to Celtic times (briga is a Celtic term for a defended area). But it was under the Romans, who arrived in the 2nd century BC, that it blossomed, thanks, in part, to its strategic position on the main route between Lisbon (Olisipo) and Braga (Bracara Augusta). After a golden age in the 1st and 2nd centuries, it eventually fell prey to barbarian attacks and, in 468 AD, it was captured by Germanic Suebi forces. Many citizens fled to nearby Aeminius (Coimbra) – thereby saving the city from destruction. As you enter the ruins, you’ll soon find a massive wall rising in front of you. Dating to the 3rd century, this was built to keep out the by-now threatening barbarians and originally ran right through the city centre – much of the city’s residential area was simply abandoned. Under the walls are a series of mosaic-floored villas, including the Casa dos Esqueletos (House of Skeletons) and Casa da Cruz Suástica (House of the Swastika) – to the Romans the swastika was a symbol of good luck. Over the wall, the Casa de Cantaber was the city’s largest private villa. You’ll find the most impressive mosaics in the 1st-century Casa dos Repuxos. These vivid illustrations, set around a small central garden, depict the four seasons and various hunting scenes. Other highlights include the remnants of the Grandes Termas do Sul (Great Southern Baths) one of the city’s several baths complexes; part of a 3km-long aqueduct; and the forum, which was originally surrounded by covered porticoes. To get to the site by public transport, Transdev runs buses from near Coimbra A station to the ruins (€2.55, 45 minutes, three times daily). You’ll need to check the precise hours, though, as they change seasonally. Coimbra’s turismo can provide timetables.
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Batalha Monastery
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Alcobaça Monastery
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Universidade de Coimbra
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The university's baroque library is Coimbra's headline sight. Named after King João V, who sponsored its construction between 1717 and 1728, it features a remarkable central hall decorated with elaborate ceiling frescoes and huge rosewood, ebony and jacaranda tables. Towering gilt chinoiserie shelves hold some 40,000 books, mainly on law, philosophy and theology. Curiously, the library also houses a colony of bats to protect the books – they eat potentially harmful insects. Note admission to the library is strictly regulated, with entry in groups at set times. At your allotted time – given when you buy your ticket – you enter through a side door and wait to be admitted to the main hall. While waiting you can peek down into the cells of the Prisão Acadêmica.
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Biblioteca Joanina
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The university's baroque library is Coimbra's headline sight. Named after King João V, who sponsored its construction between 1717 and 1728, it features a remarkable central hall decorated with elaborate ceiling frescoes and huge rosewood, ebony and jacaranda tables. Towering gilt chinoiserie shelves hold some 40,000 books, mainly on law, philosophy and theology. Curiously, the library also houses a colony of bats to protect the books – they eat potentially harmful insects. Note admission to the library is strictly regulated, with entry in groups at set times. At your allotted time – given when you buy your ticket – you enter through a side door and wait to be admitted to the main hall. While waiting you can peek down into the cells of the Prisão Acadêmica.
It's difficult to believe that a century ago, this was rocky pastureland outside an insignificant village. This vast complex is now one of Catholicism's major shrines; the focus of enormous devotion and pilgrimage. At the eastern end is the 1953 Basílica de Nossa Senhora do Rosário de Fátima, a triumphantly sheer-white building with colonnade reminiscent of St Peter’s. Nearby, the Capela das Aparições (Chapel of the Apparitions) marks the site where the Virgin appeared five times in 1917. At the precinct's western end is the Basílica da Santíssima Trindade. In between is a massive space where the crowds gather. The Capela das Aparições is the focus of the most intense devotion. Supplicants who have promised penance (for example, in return for helping a loved one who is sick, or to signify a particularly deep conversion) shuffle on their knees across the vast esplanade, following a long marble runway polished smooth by previous penitents. Near the chapel is a blazing pyre where people light candles in prayer (most just toss them in the fire due to heat and space concerns). The candles themselves range in price from €0.50 to €2.70, sold on the honour system, and candle lighting queue wait times can top half a day on the holiest of days. The sound of hundreds of candles is like a rushing waterfall. Inside the older church, the Basílica de Nossa Senhora do Rosário de Fátima, attention is focused on the tombs of the three children, Os Três Pastorinhos (the three little shepherds): Francisco (died 1919, aged 11) and Jacinta (died 1920, aged 10), both victims of the flu epidemic, were beatified in 2000 and canonised in 2017. Lúcia, the third witness of the apparition, entered a convent in Coimbra in 1928, where she died in 2005. Her beatification is underway. The new basilica, Basílica da Santíssima Trindade, was inaugurated in 2007, and, while impressive, has something of a conference-centre feel. A central passageway hung with golden angels leads to a long etched-glass window spelling out scriptural verses in dozens of languages. Running around the edges of the monumental, round marble structure are 12 9m bronze doors, each with a biblical quote dedicated to one of Jesus’ disciples. Inside, the impersonal feel is redeemed by Irish artist Catherine Green’s striking altarpiece depicting a wild-haired and gaunt Crucifixion, backed by Slovenian artist Marko Ivan Rupnik's beautiful mosaic work. At the sanctuary entrance is a segment of the Berlin Wall, a tribute to 'God’s part in the fall of communism'. Masses are held (in Portuguese) regularly, often in the Capelinha das Aparições; and there is a beautiful nightly candlelight procession at 10pm from April to October – check at the information booth near the chapel.
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Sanctuary of Our Lady of Fátima
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It's difficult to believe that a century ago, this was rocky pastureland outside an insignificant village. This vast complex is now one of Catholicism's major shrines; the focus of enormous devotion and pilgrimage. At the eastern end is the 1953 Basílica de Nossa Senhora do Rosário de Fátima, a triumphantly sheer-white building with colonnade reminiscent of St Peter’s. Nearby, the Capela das Aparições (Chapel of the Apparitions) marks the site where the Virgin appeared five times in 1917. At the precinct's western end is the Basílica da Santíssima Trindade. In between is a massive space where the crowds gather. The Capela das Aparições is the focus of the most intense devotion. Supplicants who have promised penance (for example, in return for helping a loved one who is sick, or to signify a particularly deep conversion) shuffle on their knees across the vast esplanade, following a long marble runway polished smooth by previous penitents. Near the chapel is a blazing pyre where people light candles in prayer (most just toss them in the fire due to heat and space concerns). The candles themselves range in price from €0.50 to €2.70, sold on the honour system, and candle lighting queue wait times can top half a day on the holiest of days. The sound of hundreds of candles is like a rushing waterfall. Inside the older church, the Basílica de Nossa Senhora do Rosário de Fátima, attention is focused on the tombs of the three children, Os Três Pastorinhos (the three little shepherds): Francisco (died 1919, aged 11) and Jacinta (died 1920, aged 10), both victims of the flu epidemic, were beatified in 2000 and canonised in 2017. Lúcia, the third witness of the apparition, entered a convent in Coimbra in 1928, where she died in 2005. Her beatification is underway. The new basilica, Basílica da Santíssima Trindade, was inaugurated in 2007, and, while impressive, has something of a conference-centre feel. A central passageway hung with golden angels leads to a long etched-glass window spelling out scriptural verses in dozens of languages. Running around the edges of the monumental, round marble structure are 12 9m bronze doors, each with a biblical quote dedicated to one of Jesus’ disciples. Inside, the impersonal feel is redeemed by Irish artist Catherine Green’s striking altarpiece depicting a wild-haired and gaunt Crucifixion, backed by Slovenian artist Marko Ivan Rupnik's beautiful mosaic work. At the sanctuary entrance is a segment of the Berlin Wall, a tribute to 'God’s part in the fall of communism'. Masses are held (in Portuguese) regularly, often in the Capelinha das Aparições; and there is a beautiful nightly candlelight procession at 10pm from April to October – check at the information booth near the chapel.
This great museum is a highlight of central Portugal. Housed in a 12th-century bishop's palace, it stands over the city's ancient Roman forum, remains of which can be seen in the maze of spooky tunnels under the building – the cryptoporticus. Once you emerge from this, you can start on the fascinating art collection, which runs the gamut from Gothic religious sculpture to 16th-century Flemish painting and ornately crafted furniture. Particularly spectacular is the vast recreation of a chapel from the Convento de São Domingos, but highlights abound. These include a section of the delicate cloister of São João de Almedina and some exquisite alabaster pieces from England. Sculptural works trace the development of Portuguese sculpture from the 11th century, showing how the arrival of Renaissance masters from across Europe paved the way for a distinctive Coimbra tradition. You can admire terracotta figures from a 16th-century Last Supper by the mysterious French artist Hodart and some stunning panels by the Flemish painter Quentin Metsys. A collection of gold monstrances, furniture and Moorish-influenced pieces is almost too much by the time you reach it.
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National Museum Machado de Castro
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This great museum is a highlight of central Portugal. Housed in a 12th-century bishop's palace, it stands over the city's ancient Roman forum, remains of which can be seen in the maze of spooky tunnels under the building – the cryptoporticus. Once you emerge from this, you can start on the fascinating art collection, which runs the gamut from Gothic religious sculpture to 16th-century Flemish painting and ornately crafted furniture. Particularly spectacular is the vast recreation of a chapel from the Convento de São Domingos, but highlights abound. These include a section of the delicate cloister of São João de Almedina and some exquisite alabaster pieces from England. Sculptural works trace the development of Portuguese sculpture from the 11th century, showing how the arrival of Renaissance masters from across Europe paved the way for a distinctive Coimbra tradition. You can admire terracotta figures from a 16th-century Last Supper by the mysterious French artist Hodart and some stunning panels by the Flemish painter Quentin Metsys. A collection of gold monstrances, furniture and Moorish-influenced pieces is almost too much by the time you reach it.
Offerta gastronomica
These are the closest restaurants to the house that I know of and have experienced in person. The cuisine is traditional and popular. The portions are really generous and the prices are (still) affordable.
https://goo.gl/maps/Gm6hcQpaSSYnK6j38 Indirizzo: N110 4955, Areias Orari: martedì 07–02 mercoledì 07–02 giovedì 07–02 venerdì 07–02 sabato 07–02 domenica 08:30–00 lunedì Chiuso Telefono: 249 392 190
Café_Restaurante Saavedra
https://goo.gl/maps/Gm6hcQpaSSYnK6j38 Indirizzo: N110 4955, Areias Orari: martedì 07–02 mercoledì 07–02 giovedì 07–02 venerdì 07–02 sabato 07–02 domenica 08:30–00 lunedì Chiuso Telefono: 249 392 190
https://goo.gl/maps/bR5yfxht2AjrXsmU6 Indirizzo: Nossa Senhora do Pranto Orari: martedì 07–23 mercoledì 07–23 giovedì 07–23 venerdì 07–23 sabato 07–23 domenica CHIUSO lunedì 07–23 Telefono: 249 366 302
Café Restaurante Fonte de Cima
https://goo.gl/maps/bR5yfxht2AjrXsmU6 Indirizzo: Nossa Senhora do Pranto Orari: martedì 07–23 mercoledì 07–23 giovedì 07–23 venerdì 07–23 sabato 07–23 domenica CHIUSO lunedì 07–23 Telefono: 249 366 302
https://goo.gl/maps/vSew3DPxsHRrm6K2A Indirizzo: R. das Termas, Agroal Telefono: 249 566 125
Restaurante Galfurra
https://goo.gl/maps/vSew3DPxsHRrm6K2A Indirizzo: R. das Termas, Agroal Telefono: 249 566 125
Very informal https://goo.gl/maps/BTFgdJVnBrJiL5Gw5 Tel. 236 656 374 lunedì Chiuso martedì Chiuso mercoledì Chiuso giovedì 17–00 venerdì 17–00 sabato 12–23 domenica 12–23
Amigos Café Bar
Very informal https://goo.gl/maps/BTFgdJVnBrJiL5Gw5 Tel. 236 656 374 lunedì Chiuso martedì Chiuso mercoledì Chiuso giovedì 17–00 venerdì 17–00 sabato 12–23 domenica 12–23
https://goo.gl/maps/QWM2T1RGwPAJUjEt9 Areias Tel. 249 392 292 martedì Chiuso mercoledì 08–23 giovedì 08–23 venerdì 08–23 sabato 08–23 domenica 08–23 lunedì 08–23
Tojal Douro
https://goo.gl/maps/QWM2T1RGwPAJUjEt9 Areias Tel. 249 392 292 martedì Chiuso mercoledì 08–23 giovedì 08–23 venerdì 08–23 sabato 08–23 domenica 08–23 lunedì 08–23
Casinha Velha
23, Marrazes R. Prof. Portélas
ROAD ROUTE FROM LISBON AIRPORT TO PORTUGAL NATURE HOME
https://goo.gl/maps/33o4UYGSwGAEN7dH8
Lisbon - Airport
FROM LISBON AIPORT TO PORTUGAL NATURE HOME 1:30H
Cumes
FROM LISBON AIPORT TO PORTUGAL NATURE HOME 1:30H
HIGHWAY EXIT TAKE THE IC3 (N110 TO COIMBRA) AT THE LIGHT TURN ON THE LEFT, THEN ON THE RIGHT
Cumes
HIGHWAY EXIT TAKE THE IC3 (N110 TO COIMBRA) AT THE LIGHT TURN ON THE LEFT, THEN ON THE RIGHT